Though the boards of the chocolate printer shorted just as the Dover Mini Maker Faire was starting, we still received a lot of enthusiastic thumbs up.  We printed a few snowflakes and pyramids the day before.  Looking forward to the replacement boards to get the project moving again.

Though the boards of the chocolate printer shorted just as the Dover Mini Maker Faire was starting, we still received a lot of enthusiastic thumbs up.  We printed a few snowflakes and pyramids the day before.  Looking forward to the replacement boards to get the project moving again.

Posted
2 days ago

asylum-art:

Japan’s Natural Light Shows Photographed by Takehito Miyatake

Japanese photographer Takehito Miyatake’s photos of magical firefly trails, glowing squid and awe-inspiring volcanic eruptions has recently won him Grand Prize at the 2014 Nikkei National Geographic Photo Awards. Miyatake’s long-exposure photography, which can last anywhere from 15 seconds to 30 minutes, captures what he describes as the “light of Japan.”

However, as it turns out, Miyatake’s profound reverence for the power of nature is rooted not in photography but in waka, a classical form of Japanese poetry.

1. Genji botaru fireflies around a small bridge over the Shimanto River (Kochi Prefecture)

2. A flight of hime botaru fireflies light up the forest to create a dreamy, fairytale-like spectacle

3.In spring, firefly squid (hotaru ika) rise 2000 feet to the surface of the water and offer a fleeting glimpse of their magical lights

4.Volcanic lightning during the eruption of the Sakurajima volcano

5. A long-exposure shot of the Showa crater, the most active volcano in Sakurajima, underneath the stars

6.The Milky Way glittering above the woods with the green lights of fireflies dancing in the foreground.

7. Scores of fishing rafts floating in the Uchino-umi highlighted by the light from the full moon.

8. The moon lights up a waterfall against geometric rock formations

9. A close-up of the red-hot cinders erupting from the Showa crater on Sakurajima

10. Volcanic lightning over the Sakurajima eruption.

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Posted
3 days ago
georgetakei:

I’m feeling silly, and this was perfectly stupid and fun. 
Talk about perfect timing. http://ohmyyy.gt/Mqr7VL

Good reminder of what I should be expecting.  Teaching a freshmen seminar this coming semester.  Should be fun.

georgetakei:

I’m feeling silly, and this was perfectly stupid and fun.

Talk about perfect timing. http://ohmyyy.gt/Mqr7VL

Good reminder of what I should be expecting.  Teaching a freshmen seminar this coming semester.  Should be fun.

Notes
540
Posted
3 days ago

asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka


The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.

Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.

(via asylum-art)

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Posted
1 week ago

asylum-art:

New Aquatic Wildlife Painted in Layers of Resin by Keng Lye

Flickr, Facebook,(kenglye) on deviantART

With the exception of the repurposed containers, almost every aspect of these artworks by Singapore-based artist Keng Lye  has been rendered in acrylic paint, carefully applied within layers of clear resin. A fish in a plastic bag, a tin can of tadpoles swirling under a frog on a lilypad, and even a completely convincing betta constructed from carved resin and painted with acrylic—each work a strange, lifelike amalgam of painting and sculpture.

Wow!

Notes
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Posted
1 week ago

cross-connect:

Featured Curator: Justin Ruckman

The artist and painter Eduardo Rodriguez Calzado describes himself as being obsessed with detail, “expressing emotions through the fragmentation of color”. While the human form or elements of human consciousness are often represented in his pieces, he also enjoys starting with more abstract gestures and colors, and letting the narrative unfold organically.

These are really powerful.  Thanks for posting.

(via jruckman)

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Posted
1 week ago
Toast Is Me, I Am Toast →

"What is toast?" says Snowman to himself, once they’ve run off. Toast is when you take a piece of bread—What is bread? Bread is when you take some flour—What is flour? We’ll skip that part, it’s too complicated. Bread is something you eat, made from a ground-up plant and shaped like a stone. You…

Just read Oryx and Crake…best lines about toast, ever.

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Posted
3 weeks ago